27th International Sri Chinmoy 12+24 Hour Race Basel

For the 27th time the Sri Chinmoy Marathon Team organized its yearly ultra event, the 12+24 Hour Race in  Basel, Switzerland, with around 100 participants from all over Europe. It was also the 3rd Swiss 12-Hour Championship. Watch the highlights, interviews, the award ceremony and much more in this video, compiled by kedarvideo with music by Kamalakanta and Parichayaka.

Flute Marathon

In August of 2005, Sri Chinmoy (1931-2007) celebrated his 74th birthday and gave several musical performances incorporating the number 74. Among these was the playing on 74 different flutes, the majority of them being presented in this video. Sri Chinmoy always tried to transcend himself in many fields! Length: 43:19 min. Filmed and edited by Kedar Misani.

Agnikana’s Concert in Canberra

agnikana-concert

Today a concert by the Agnikana-Group (Disciple girls from Eastern European countries) performed at the Auditorium of the “China in the World Building” at the ANU (Australian National University) in Canberra. A Jharna-Kala slideshows was shown as background. The public liked both the music and the artwork, as the following comments show:

“Perfection. Excellent impression. Voice, instruments, pictures, just perfection.” – Himanshu, Nicholls
“Enlightening and cleansing. An inner peace just beautiful.” – Bob, Gungahlin
“An extremely novel and peaceful experience! Great combination of visual and audio experience!” – Amnila, Ngunnawal

“A cloud of happiness.
An angelic choir.
A swirl of art,
A symphony of colour.”
– Michael, Spence

“Music from Heaven direct to my heart.” – Giulio Zambon
“Tranquility and vivid dynamic visuals – SUPERB!!!!” – Norm, Lyneham
“I never knew sweetness and light could be so powerful!” – James, Hawker
“A soulful man has captured everyone.” – Abi Nathan, Gungahlin
“Sri Chinmoy’s paintings show the soul of Sri Chinmoy – truly divine and beautiful and touching your heart. Agnikana’s group sing like angels and the music touches the heart. Thank you.” – Kathleen Guyer, Binalong
“Amazing vocals, and variety of instruments, very much enjoyed, thanks!” – Royce, Jerrabomberra
“Beautiful and so relaxing. Sounded like angels!” – Anita, O’Connor
“Uplifting, soulful, transcendent!” – Martin, Weston
“An utterly sublime experience. I never thought paintings can create such a sense of peace and joy. The music and performance was wonderful. Thank you for the opportunity and sharing.” – Shubhra Roy, Ngunnawal
“To be fair to all – the music, colours, imagination, the voices, the musical instruments, the atmosphere. Wonderful, please come to my bedside.” – Ruth, Lyneham

Meditation-Silence No. 33

This is the 33rd episode of the series “Meditation-Silence” which focuses on the power of early morning meditation. It also includes a meditation video of Sri Chinmoy, taken this time during a meditation in the Eighties in Queens, NY. Today’s quote is on “Progress”:

“We all wish to make progress, continuous and constant. How is it that we do not make satisfactory progress? We do not make satisfactory progress precisely because we live in the world of complaints. We complain and because we complain, we do not make any progress. Because we do not love God, we complain and because we complain, we do not love God. And because we think of the world too much, we make no progress.”

– Sri Chinmoy, from “Wings of Joy”, first published by Fireside, NY, 1997.

Produced and filmed by kedarvideo, Switzerland; Narration: Kanan Roberts; Music: “Flute Music for Meditation” © Sri Chinmoy.

The Seattle statue

Recently a new photo of the Seattle statue of Sri Chinmoy has been published by Robyn on flickr. The life-size sculpture is situated along the Union Lake and Fremont bridge and attracts many visitors who walk by.

Rhododendron loranthiflorum ‘Sri Chinmoy’

Rhododendron-sri-chinmoy

Rhododendron loranthiflorum ‘Sri Chinmoy’

Rhododendron loranthiflorum Sleumer is a tropical, epiphytic, Vireya species with white perfumed flowers found on the island of Bougainville in the Solomon Islands at an altitude of about 1000m. In Melbourne, a number of specimens have been growing out of doors in the garden of John Rouse for the last 25 years. One particular clone is outstanding in that it is easily cultivated, grows as a dense shrub and is highly floriferous with some flowers to be found at most times of the year. Here we give a brief introduction to the species and its natural habitat and describe our outstanding specimen that has been named after the New York Guru Sri Chinmoy to honour his international endeavours to attain world peace.

The tropical vireyas are naturally distributed in the equatorial region bounded by the Philippines in the north, Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia in the west, North Queensland in the south and the Solomon Islands in the east, with a concentration of species diversity found on the islands of New Guinea and Borneo. These two regions of species concentration are separated by Wallacea (Wallace, 1869), the biologically discontinuous region which contains the line of join between Eurasia and the Australian plate when they collided some 10 million years ago and brought together their own groups of animals and plants. The tropical vireyas, which probably arose from a wandering Himalayan ancestor, have developed over the past three or four million years with considerable isolation between the species east and west of Wallacea. Mostly, the tropical vireyas are found in the mountains at altitudes of 1000 to 4000m above sea level, so while day and night times are equal the year round and relative humidity is high, the temperature is lower than that at tropical sea level. Rhododendron loranthiflorum is a scaly species in subgenus Rhododendron, section Vireya, subsection Solenovireya (Sleumer, 1966). This subsection contains over 30 species spread out from Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia to Bougainville but excluding Java and Australia. Their characteristics include well spread out flowers with a tubular corolla and a relatively long, straight or slightly curved tube. This collection of species appears to lack cohesion in that their diverse properties suggest that they should be divided into two or more taxa (Stevens, 1985; Williams and Rouse, 1997).

SOURCE: scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals